Annual Title I Schoolwide Plan

Date: 2017-18

Revision

Title I schools implementing schoolwide programs are required to develop schoolwide plans in accordance with Section 1114(b) of the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA).  Guidelines for plan development include the following:

  • The plan should be developed with the involvement of:
    • Parents;
    • Other members of the community to be served;
    • Individuals who will carry out the plan, including teachers, principals, other school leaders, administrators, paraprofessionals present in the school;
    • The local education agency;
    • To the extent feasible, tribes and tribal organizations present in the community; and
    • If appropriate
      • Specialized instructional support personnel;
      • Technical assistance providers;
      • School staff; and
    • If the plan relates to a secondary school, students and other individuals determined by the school;
  • The plan should be available to the Local Educational Agency (LEA), parents, and the public; information in the plan should be in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language that parents can understand; and
  • If appropriate and applicable, the plan should be developed in coordination and integration with other federal, state, and local services, resources, and  programs, such as programs supported under ESSA, violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start programs, adult education programs, career and technical education programs, and schools implementing comprehensive support and improvement activities or targeted support and improvement activities under section 1111(d).

The ESEA requires four components to be included in the schoolwide plan. The template below provides a framework that may be used to develop and/or update a schoolwide plan. For each component, the narrative section in the template should be completed in sufficient detail to document how the component has been thoroughly and thoughtfully addressed. Schoolwide plans should be reviewed annually and revised as necessary to promote continuous improvement and to reflect the school’s initiatives to upgrade the entire educational program of the school. To maintain focus, eliminate duplication of effort, and promote comprehensiveness, schools should operate under a single plan if at all possible. A school that already has a plan for school improvement might consider amending it, rather than starting over, provided that the existing plan was based on a comprehensive needs assessment and can be revised to include the four required schoolwide components. This template can be used by schools with existing Indistar® plans to reference indicators and tasks in the Indistar® plan that related to the schoolwide components.

Directions: Complete each of the four components by following these steps:

Using Indistar®:

  • Access the Title I Schoolwide Plan template from the “Complete Form” tab of the Indistar® dashboard.
  • Provide a narrative response that describes how the school has addressed the requirements for each component;
  • Where applicable, identify the indicator(s) and task number(s) from the school’s Indistar® plan that align with each required component;
  • Click “Save” at the bottom of the form to save your responses; and
  • Submit the plan to your LEA Division Contact by returning to the dashboard. Under the “Submit Forms/Reports” tab, go to the Title I Plans section, and select the Title I Schoolwide Plan “Submit” button.

NotUsing Indistar®:

  • Access the Title I Schoolwide Plan template on the Title I website.
  • Provide a narrative response that describes how the school has addressed the requirements for each component; and
  • Submit the plan as directed by your LEA Title I Coordinator.

Resources:

Schoolwide program resources, including USED guidance on Designing Schoolwide Programs, Supporting School Reform by Leveraging Federal Funds in a Schoolwide Program, and Title I Fiscal Issues, can be accessed at the Title I website under Guidelines and Procedures/Federal Guidance.

A Virginia Department of Education presentation on Requirements and Implementation of a Title I Schoolwide Program can be accessed at:  http://www.doe.virginia.gov/federal_programs/esea/index.shtml.

Component 1 §1114(b)(6):

A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school that takes into account information on the academic achievement of children in relation to the challenging state academic standards, particularly the needs of those children who are failing, or are at-risk of failing, to meet the challenging state academic standards and any other factors as determined by the Local Educational Agency.

Evidence:

A systematic effort involving multiple stakeholders to acquire an accurate and thorough picture of strengths and weaknesses of the school community, thus identifying student needs through a variety of information-gathering techniques. A data analysis summary must be included which incorporates benchmarks used to evaluate program results. The results of your data analysis must guide the reform strategies that you will implement to improve instruction for all students.

Narrative:

In June 2017, teachers in grades K-5, administrators, and resource positions such as special education, ESOL, reading, and math participated in an end of year reflection of the 2016-2017 SIIP, consisting of a data analysis for all content areas using preliminary data. This analysis looked at not only SOL data, but also DRA2 for K-5 and MRA data for math in the primary grades. During the month of August, the balanced literacy committee, math committee, and instructional leadership committee (including instructional coaches), once again reconnected with the data analysis process with the finalized data and wrote a new SIIP for the 2017-2018 school year. All grade level teams participated in a planning day in August, prior to the beginning of the school year. Data results and instructional strategies for the new school year were shared at both team planning days and our school year kickoff meeting with all staff. Parklawn met accreditation in all subject areas, with the greatest increase being in science (62% to 76% pass rate).

Throughout the school year, grade levels teams will meet quarterly to reflect on common assessment data and universal screener data. The SIIP committees will meet quarterly to reflect upon progress and goals with a school wide lens.

2017-2018 SMARTR Goals:

Literacy: A minimum of 84% of students will score at the pass proficient or pass advanced as measured by the spring 2018 Reading SOL for VDOE accreditation.

Math: A minimum of 88% of students will score at the pass proficient or pass advanced as measured by the spring 2018 Mathematics SOL test for VDOE state accreditation.

Science: A minimum of 79% of students will score at the pass proficient or pass advanced as measured by the spring 2018 Science SOL test for accreditation.

Social Studies: A minimum of 84% of 4th grade students will score at the level of pass proficient or pass advanced as measured by the spring 2018 Social Studies SOL.

Budget Implications:

Funding for SIIP committee meetings and grade level team days (summer and quarterly), instructional coach position.

Component 2 §1114(b)(7)(A)(i):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children, including each of the subgroups of students (as defined in section 1111(c)(2)) to meet the challenging state academic standards.

Evidence:

Scientifically-based research strategies based on identified needs and designed to raise the achievement level of all students on content standards. Provide information on how the selected strategies will increase student achievement in underperforming subgroups, if applicable. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative: 

Using the process and data discussed above, the following strategies are being implemented for the 2017-2018 school year.

Parklawn has invested large amounts of time and resources to unify best instructional practices in mathematics, reading, and science instruction including the following actions:

--Teams in grades K-5 meet as Collaborative Learning Teams (CLTs) two hours a week for literacy and math. During these times, all teams:

  • Utilize the FCPS Collaborative Team Cycle (Plan, Do, Study, Act) to map curriculum, unpack standards for instruction, develop common assessment, and design lessons implementing Best Practices
  • Plan lessons using a common structure such as the LEARN model and What, Why, How from FCPS literacy pacing guides
  • Analyze common assessment data using a structured protocol: will include formative data (i.e. exit tickets), unit assessments, and quarterly assessments. FCPS assessments will include the MRA for grades 1and 2, quarterly Horizon assessments in 3-5 for math, reading, and science; the use of universal screener data to inform grade level goals and instruction, classroom lessons, and targeted intervention and enrichment for small groups and individuals
  • Use division resources within the electronic Curriculum Assessment Resource Tool (eCART), including pacing guides and print resources across content areas

--Teams will plan and execute a workshop model in both literacy and math to provide differentiated small group instruction to meet a continuum of student learning needs

  • The literacy block is extended to two hours in length (beyond 90 minute FCPS expectation) to provide for additional small group instruction
  • The math block provides opportunity for math stations/work time, guided math instruction, and number sense routines
  • A focus on student discourse throughout all content areas is being explored through professional development and implemented with scaffolds to support all students in engaging in conversation, deepen student understanding, and provide opportunities for oral development particularly for English Learners

--Intervention for Literacy and mathematics

  • Responsive Instruction is in place at Parklawn with a school-wide RI Core team and grade level structures in place. The RI Core team includes our instructional coaches, math resource teacher, reading specialist, and administrator. The grade level teacher, ESOL teacher, and special education teacher join each meeting to discuss needs, interventions, and progress for students identified as requiring Tier 2 and Tier 3 instruction. These meetings occur after grade level “Kid Watch” conversations have already occurred
  • Grade level teams discuss individual students using an R10 protocol to identify strengths, needs, and next steps for instruction and intervention for students in math, literacy, and behavior. (Known as “Kid Watch”)
  • Classroom teachers collaborate with reading teachers and math teachers for identified interventions for students. When deemed appropriate, ESOL teachers and special education teachers also support interventions

--Parklawn offers the following support to our students:

  • Young Scholar s program for students who have been traditionally underrepresented in Advanced Academics classrooms
  • Dreambox, Imagine Learning, and MyOn software that allows students to experience instruction at their level

--Grades K-3 are provided two hours during quarterly planning days for pacing and planning of science and social studies content. Grades 4 and 5 are provided two hours monthly for science/social studies planning and pacing

Evaluation of Effectiveness:

Quarterly review of student data will be conducted by each grade level to determine the effectiveness of our programs. Additionally, the use of frequent, targeted feedback visits will be used to monitor the implementation of Tier 1 instructional practices

Budget Implications:

Purchase of Dreambox and Imagine Learning, hiring of resource support teachers for math and language arts and instructional coach,

-Purchase of student laptops for access to technology based programs (grades 3-5 now 1-1), Title I funding for additional CLT time for grades 4 and 5, and quarterly planning days.

Component 3 §1114(b)(7)(ii):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that use methods and instructional strategies that strengthen the academic program in the school; increase the amount and quality of learning time; and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, which may include programs, activities, and courses necessary to provide a well-rounded education.

Evidence:

Scientifically-based research strategies or activities that strengthen and enrich the academic program by: extending the school day; embedding reading and/or mathematics curricula into other instructional areas; or other strategies as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative:

Instructional Practices:

  • All grade levels K-5 are implementing number sense routines at the beginning of each math workshop to foster number sense, critical thinking, mental math, communication, and a variety of math strategies
  • Grade level teams are exploring and implementing differentiated and rigorous math tasks to deepen conceptual understanding of math content
  • Grade level teams are exploring and implementing the use of interactive read alouds in the literacy block. Professional development through the FCPS literacy symposium and follow up professional development at the school level has provided further learning and opportunities for teachers to collaboratively plan for interactive read alouds
  • Professional development and strategic collaborative planning around student discourse is being implemented across all content areas and grade levels (to include fine arts and PE) to foster student communication, oral development, and critical thinking. This professional development includes FCPS literacy symposium, Region 2 math symposium, and facilitated PD at Parklawn by Instructional coaches, math resource teachers, and reading specialists.
  • Reading specialists and instructional coaches are collaborating to provide literacy PD in CLTs on topics such as guided reading structures, interactive read alouds, and reading conferences
  • CLT Leaders meetings are held monthly for three hours to provide professional development on facilitation skills, structures, and protocols. This time also provides opportunity for teachers to collaborate with content and instructional coaches on agendas and supports for teams
  • Parklawn has a coaching team of two instructional coaches, 2.5 reading coaches, and 1.5 math coaches to support content coaching in classrooms and team development in CLTs

Amount and Quality of Learning Time:

  • Daily Intervention and Enrichment Time (I/E Time) is designated in every teachers’ master schedule to provide time for collaboration of differentiated instruction and interventions in math and literacy. Special education, ESOL, literacy, and math teachers are available to support students
  • Pending funding, consideration is being made for Winter/Spring Afterschool Intervention for students in grades 3-5 who are at risk of failing the SOLs.

Enriching and Accelerating Student Learning:

  • LTC (Learning Through Content): Students in grades K-5 participate weekly in a Spanish class with a science/STEAM lens to support science and critical thinking
  • As a Local Level IV AAP program, teachers in grades 3-5 collaborate together and share resources used in Local Level IV classrooms for possible implementation in all classrooms

Evaluation of Effectiveness:

Quarterly review of student data will be conducted by each grade level to determine ongoing student achievement and the effectiveness of our programs. Additionally, the use of frequent, targeted feedback visits will be used to monitor the implementation of Tier 1 instructional practices. Grade level teams document their CLT work using a team drive to capture their learning and shared focus of Tier I Instruction. This includes unpacking content, lesson plans, common assessments and data analysis.

Budget Implications:

Funding for teachers to attend the Numbers and Operations math course through Title I, Funding for afterschool extensions of professional learning around interactive read alouds, funding for instructional coach, literacy, and math coaches.

Component 4 §1114(b)(7)(iii):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs those at risk of not meeting the challenging state academic standards, through activities which may include—

  • Counseling, school-based mental health programs, specialized instructional support services, mentoring services, and other strategies to improve students’ skills outside the academic subject areas;
  • Preparation for and awareness of opportunities for postsecondary education and the workforce, which may include career and technical education programs and broadening secondary school students’ access to coursework to earn postsecondary credit while still in high school (such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual or concurrent enrollment, or early college high schools);
  • Implementation of a schoolwide tiered model to prevent and address problem behavior, and early intervening services, coordinated with similar activities and services carried out under the Individuals with Disabilities  Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);
  • Professional development and other activities for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other school personnel to improve instruction and use of data from academic assessments, and to recruit and retain effective teachers, particularly in high-need subjects; and
  • Strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs and, if programs are consolidated, the specific state educational agency and local education agency programs and other federal programs that will be consolidated in the schoolwide program.

Evidence:  

Scientifically-based research strategies or activities such as student support services; behavior intervention systems; tiered systems of support; teacher recruitment and/or retention activities; or other activities as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative:

School Readiness and Transitions

  • FECEP office staff and the Family Services team assist schools in their effort to inform FECEP parents about Kindergarten Orientation and encourage their attendance
  • Kindergarten Orientation is held each spring to share highlights of the kindergarten program and help parents begin the registration process
  • Substitute time is available for kindergarten teachers and FECEP teachers to visit each other’s classrooms to help them prepare and receive students
  • Incoming kindergarteners are assessed each summer before the beginning of school to provide baseline data and inform instruction
  • Parents’ attendance at school functions is encouraged and celebrated
  • Home visits conducted by all staff of all Early Childhood programs provide materials, information, books, and modeling lessons to parents
  • Incoming kindergarteners with no preschool experience participated in the Bridge to Kindergarten program

Social, Emotional, and Mental Health:

  • The Student Support Team meets monthly to discuss student and family needs. This team consists of administrators, counselors, social worker, and school psychologist. Often the parent liaison joins the team as well as we discuss social needs and community resources.
  • Mentor Works program provides mentors from our community who meet one-on-one with our students weekly • We will be offering several parent workshops this year focusing on a variety of topics
  • Our community partnership with Grand Involve provides Parklawn with weekly volunteers to develop personal relationships and support teachers and students in classrooms for instruction
  • Staff Professional Development will include continued learning around Cultural Proficiency training
  • Parent Liaison received a full-time contract through FCPS to support the partnerships between our students, families, and staff. This also includes supporting our volunteer program and family literacy program.

Behavior and Goal-Directed Learning:

  • Responsive Instruction is in place at Parklawn with a school-wide RI Core team and grade level structures in place. The RI Core team includes our instructional coaches, math resource teacher, reading specialist, and administrator. For instances of behavior concerns, the school counselor(s), social worker, and psychologists join the grade level teacher and RI Core team. These meetings occur after grade level “Kid Watch” conversations have already occurred
  • Grade level teams discuss individual students using an R10 protocol to identify strengths, needs, and next steps for instruction and intervention for students in behavior. (Kid Watch)
  • A vertical team of teachers, counselors, and administrators established the Parklawn Pride Committee. This committee implements and promotes school-wide behavior expectations aligned with a Positive Behavior Approach, with a focus on Responsive Classroom
  • Student Leadership and stewardship are developed through student participation in grades 1-5 in the Parklawn SCA

Budget Implications:

Possible funding for a part of the parent liaison contract (depending on fall budget adjustments), funding for summer kindergarten testing.

Evaluation of Effectiveness:

Use of kindergarten summer data to support class placement and instruction. SST notes and office referral data will be monitored throughout the year. Family attendance for events will also be monitored for participation.